Saturday, February 17, 2018

EAT YOUR BOOKS

Weekly Round-Up | 
     Recipes | Books | Blog      Weekly Round-Up
Dear Bookman Beattie,

Do you find other people's comments on recipes helpful? Have you written your own recipe Notes? It’s a great way to remind yourself how a dish turned out and share your experience with the EYB community. On each Recipe Details page you'll find a Notes tab.

Adding online recipes to your EYB Bookshelf is a really great way to expand your personal recipe collection. You can do this even if you have a free membership!

We're featuring online recipes from these books, magazines and blogs – check them out.

Happy cooking and baking everyone!

The team at EatYourBooks
                        

Member Photo of the Week:
Chinese-Inspired Chicken Noodle Soup from Simply Nigella: Feel Good Food by Nigella Lawson

Photo submitted by grindabod. Have you uploaded any of your own photos yet? Learn more!

From Websites:
Blood Orange Greek Yogurt Poppy Seed Breakfast Cake from indexed blog Eats Well with Others

From Cookbooks:
9 recipes from Le Creuset: A Collection of Recipes from Our French Table
Enter the Le Creuset GIVEAWAY! (US only)
3 recipes from The Immigrant Cookbook: Recipes That Make America Great collected & edited by Leyla Moushabeck
Enter The Immigrant Cookbook GIVEAWAY! (US only)
1 recipe from The Complete Plate: 120 Recipes · 30 Meals · A Stronger, Healthier, Happier You by Lauren Klukas
Enter The Complete Plate GIVEAWAY! (US/CAN only)
8 recipes from Weligama: Recipes from Sri Lanka by Emily Dobbs

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Latest from The Bookseller


Connect Books
Connect Books has been sold to private equity firm Aurelius for just £6m – nearly half of the originally-agreed sale price.
Katherine Rundell
Established names such as Patrick Ness, Katherine Rundell and Jim Kay are longlisted for the 2018 CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway medals alongside debut authors Angie Thomas, Julia Sarda and Sam Winston.
The All Party Parliamentary Group on Publishing has called for evidence from the trade as it seeks to maintain a “world-leading” publishing sector in the UK.
Brazil Flag
Brazil's book market saw real growth of 3.1% last year, according to Brazilian book trade publication PublishNews. 
Christina Dalcher
HQ has bought a "powerful feminist dystopia" by linguistics academic Christina Dalcher, billed as "The Handmaid’s Tale meets The Power", in a six-figure deal.
Audible
The first group of emerging playwrights to benefit from Audible's $5m fund will include two British writers: Gary McNair, from Glasgow, and James Fritz, from London. 
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We Begin Our Ascent
Borough Press has scooped a debut novel by British author Joe Mungo Reed, described as "dazzling" by his professor George Saunders.
Michael O'Mara Books
Michael O’Mara Books is expanding its publishing programme by launching a new audiobook list for key titles. 
Angela Levin
John Blake Publishing, part of Bonnier Publishing UK, is releasing a "definitive" biography of Prince Harry by journalist and author Angela Levin.
Caledonia Novel Award
Scottish novelist Elizabeth Macneal has won this year’s Caledonia Novel Award for her "masterful" historical fiction debut, The Doll Factory, set in Victorian London.
Karnac Books
One of London’s oldest independent bookshops, Karnac, has moved to a new location on Finchley Road.
The Vagina Monologues
Virago and the Gender Balance Network staged a sold-out performance of Eve Ensler’s The Vagina Monologues at Hachette UK's offices in London on Valentine's Day to raise hundreds of pounds for charity.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Farro Risotto (Farrotto) with Radicchio and Bacon


DavidLebovitz

Farro Risotto (Farrotto) with Radicchio and Bacon
David, 14 Feb


This dish came together rather serendipitously on a Sunday afternoon. I was up to my elbows testing recipes and was looking for something savory for dinner that didn’t require too much prep, or dishes afterward. I’d brought home some colorful radicchio from the market, I had some bacon (don’t I always?), and there was a packet dried mushrooms in a kitchen drawer. So I gathered everything up and searched through my grains, to see what was in there.
I eat a ton of pasta, specifically whole grain pasta, which I can’t resist, especially if there’s garlic or radicchio involved. (And bacon, of course.) But in between a few bags of pasta was a small sack of petit épeautre (wheat berries) and a similar-sized bag of something unlabeled, which I was sure was farro. Whatever it was, the two bags came out to about 1 cup, which was just the right amount to make a wheat berry risotto, or farrotto.

 
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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

How to have a cool time in this summer madness.


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Chill Thrill
February is known as a hot sticky month, and it has certainly lived up to that these past few weeks in Auckland. It’s been meltingly, swelteringly moist and clammy, with thick wet air that clings to everything. It makes paper wrinkle, your hair go limp and your mascara run. Hang a towel out on the line after a shower, and bring it in wetter than when you hung it out. Yeah Yeah. We are all so over it.
BUT there is one perfect dish to bring relief and make you feel human again, albeit briefly: Gazpacho! Just saying the name makes me do a little jig with excitement! Yes, a bowl of icy, truly icy – stick it in the freezer type of icy – gazpacho is summer’s antidote to stinking hot weather. I can’t emphasise enough the word ICY ‘cause a warm gazpacho is like a hot hug on a sticky day. Nope. No good. Who wants that? Chill it down in the freezer until it’s got icy shards forming on the sides of the container, serve to waiting mouths, then you'll discover its magic.
Gazpacho
And this version is easy and quick with minimum faffing about, though you might like to make a tray of crunchy croutons. They’re a great contrast to a smooth gazpacho like this one (there are many versions), and they are a good way of using up drying crusts of sourdough bread. Garlic Croûtons

Looking for something a bit fancy-pants to serve friends coming around? Check out my summer-autumnal salmon salad (it’ll do nicely in both seasons). It’s pretty as a picture, loaded with vegetables and full of goodness, and to top it off it has a drizzle or two of low-fat yoghurt sauce.
The sauce is pretty awesome in its own right. It’s flavoured with dill. Yes, yes, I know, not everyone likes dill. If you don’t like it, leave it out, and maybe replace it with something tamer like chives and parsley, (or coriander/cilantro if you like it). But the thing about dill – it’s a pungent little herb for sure – it deals to the rich taste of salmon like no other flavour. Check it out.
Dill
Hot-smoked Salmon Salad with Beets, Potatoes & Yoghurt Dill Sauce
The yoghurt dill sauce works a treat on a whole heap of other dishes, too, and what I love about it is its fresh clean flavour. Garlic gives it pungency … the trick is to make sure you are buying New Zealand garlic if you are in this country, as it is in season, and it is plump, juicy and hasn’t yet started to form the green sprout.
Yoghurt Dill Sauce
There are a few tips to cooking beetroot, and the easiest method is to stick it in a pot and cook gently until tender. How do you tell if one is tender? If you prick beetroot with a fork during cooking it bleeds out of the colour. Have a look at the pic and see how easy it is to tell whether a beet is good to go, or whether it needs a bit more cooking. Here's a quick way to pickle them.
Pickled Beets

Well that’s it for this week. What I suggest is that you make a big fat batch of gazpacho, stick it in the freezer for an hour and scoff it outside this evening before the mozzies arrive.
You can always comment at the end of a recipe to let me know your thoughts. I mostly reply (though not to rude ones! HaHa!)
Julie



 

Monday, February 5, 2018

The top-rated cookbooks of 2017


I thought you may be interested in our Best of the Best roundup which we compiled from 350 best cookbooks of 2017 lists. The top-rated cookbook worldwide was Sweet by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh. When you have a moment, please explore the other cookbooks that made the list. I know you have produced a best cookbooks list in previous years but I was unable to find one from you this year. If I missed it, please send me a link and I will add it to the roundup.
 
In addition to the worldwide top 15, we compiled lists from reviewers in Canada, UK/Ireland, Australia/NZ and specialist lists for Vegetarian/Vegan, Drinks, and Memoirs/Books about food. We also have provided a list of the top selling cookbooks of 2017 from cookbook stores around the world.
 
You love cookbooks, don’t you? Wouldn’t you like to use them better? Joining Eat Your Books will do that for you – a search engine of more than 1.5 million recipes in cookbooks, food magazines and online so you can find the perfect recipe in your own collection in seconds. Join using the voucher code 18TRIAL60 for a free 60 day trial. If you like using the site and write about it, let us know and we will upgrade you to a free lifetime membership. You can find out more about the site on our About Us pages or email me with any questions.
 
Looking forward to hearing from you,
Jane
 
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Jane Kelly, Co-founder of Eat Your Books
 
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Monday, January 29, 2018

A Visit to the All-Clad Cookware Factory


DavidLebovitz

A Visit to the All-Clad Cookware Factory
David, 29 Jan

There’s nothing I love more than a factory tour, especially when it has something to do with food, or cooking. So I jumped at the chance to visit the All-Clad factory while on book tour. Pittsburgh is a city known for its metal industry – most notably, steel, and while much of the metalworking factories have wound down, or closed, All-Clad is still going strong.

I was first introduced to All-Clad cookware when I started working in restaurants. The pots and pans were rugged, easy to manoeuver, and not too heavy, so as a line cook, you could lift a whole stack of skillets when setting up your station, but they were strong enough to stand up to restaurant cooking, which involves a lot of unpredictable heat, and banging around. I threw a sauté pan against a wall during a particularly stressful service, which fortunately missed a lot of people in its trajectory. The pan also survived my tantrum, unscathed.

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